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Quotes by Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche

Khenpo was one of the last of the generation of great masters who trained and attained realization while in Tibet. There was no one like him. He was what legends are made of.

And the way he would teach Dzogchen was quite out of this world. Nobody who ever met him could forget his extraordinary presence or the spirit in which he taught, which embodied so perfectly the fathomless ease and vastness of Dzogpachenpo.

For in every way, he himself was the greatest statement of Dzogchen, in simply how he was and how he incarnated that natural ease of the innermost nature of mind, semnyi ngalso, the "natural great peace" he wrote of so beautifully:[n]This introduction to Nyoshul Khen was written by Richard Barron in A Marvelous Garland of Rare Gems.

Rest in natural great peace.
This exhausted mind,
Beaten helpless by karma and neurotic thoughts
Like the relentless fury of the pounding waves
In the infinite ocean of samsara.
Rest in natural great peace.

...

We exhaust ourselves in three ways: We create fabrications like mental concepts. We exert a lot of effort. We create many objects or targets in our minds. These are the three things that really tire us. It is like an insect caught in a spider's web: the more agitated it becomes, the more tangled it gets in the web. This creates real suffering, real torment for the mind.

...

If you were to gather all the glory, enjoyment, pleasure
and happiness of the world and put it all together,
it would not approach one tiny fraction of the bliss
that you experience upon realizing the nature of mind.

...

To end suffering - not only by relieving its symptoms but by eradicating its root cause - is precisely the aim of the Buddha's teaching. We must first realize that the true cause of suffering is not outside, but inside. That is why true spiritual practice consists of working on one's own mind. The mind is very powerful. It can create happiness or suffering, heaven or hell. If, with the help of the Dharma, you manage to eliminate your inner poisons, nothing from outside will ever affect your happiness, but as long as those poisons remain in your mind, you will not find the happiness you seek anywhere in the world.

...

Profound and tranquil, free from complexity, uncompounded luminous clarity, beyond the mind of conceptual ideas; this is the depth of the mind of the Victorious Ones. In this there is not a thing to be removed, nor anything that needs to be added. It is merely the immaculate looking naturally at itself.

...

Even in this world, and even now, there are said to be many hidden yogis or discreet yogis, called bepay naljor in Tibetan. It means those realized ones who are not generally recognized as great spiritual sages or saints, but have deeply tasted the fruit of enlightenment, and are living it. Perhaps they are anonymously doing their good works here among us right now!

The infinite vast expanse is one’s own inconceivable nature. Who can say who has realized it and who hasn’t? When we travel around the world or experience other dimensions, there are so many beings who have tasted it. We can see it in their behavior, in their countenance, and in stories that are told—not just in the Dzogchen tradition or the Buddhist tradition, but in any tradition, and in our Western world too.This true nature is so vast and inconceivable that even some birds and animals and beings in other unseen dimensions can be said to have realized it, as in some of the ancient Indian Jataka stories and other teaching tales. It is always said that everything is the self-radiant display of the primordial Buddha Samantabhadra. There are infinite numbers of Buddhas and infinite numbers of beings. Who can say who is excluded from it? (from the book Natural Great Perfection: Dzogchen Teachings And Vajra Songs)

...

Rest in natural great peace, this exhausted mind,
Beaten helpless by karma and neurotic thought,
Like the relentless fury of the pounding waves
In the infinite ocean of samsara.
Rest in natural great peace.

...

When the root of duality – dualistic clinging, dualistic perceptions, deluded perceptions – is severed, all the leaves, the branches, and even the tree trunk of samsara and nirvana naturally wither on their own and topple in their own time. Then this great spreading tree of samsara and nirvana, of duality, of worldliness, of conditioned being, does not need to be chopped down: it is already as if dead. We can relax; done is what had to be done, as the Buddha sang.

This is the whole point of the dharma, of spiritual awakening, of buddhahood; this is its ultimate evolution or unfolding. If we aspire to experience such an awakening, there is nothing else to do except recognize the true nature of our primordial awareness, our own essential being, our own birthright, which is within. This is the intrinsic nature of our own heart-mind, also known as bodhicitta or bodhi-mind. It is our own being, our own nature, this renowned buddha-nature. It is not a buddha anywhere else.

...

Free of distraction, free of clinging, free of meditation. Beyond intellect: Remain in the state beyond intellect. Great Perfection. Selfless, unborn, free of extremes,
inexpressible.

...

Profound and tranquil, free from complexity,
Uncompounded luminous clarity,
Beyond the mind of conceptual ideas;
This is the depth of the mind of the Victorious Ones.
In this there is not a thing to be removed,
Nor anything that needs to be added.
It is merely the immaculate
Looking naturally at itself

...

Look outward at the appearing objects,
And like the water in a mirage,
They are more delusive than delusion.
Unreal like dreams and illusions,
They resemble reflected moon and rainbows.

Look inward at your own mind.
It seems quite exciting, when not examined.
But when examined, there is nothing to it.
Appearing without being, it is nothing but empty.
It cannot be identified saying, "that's it!"
But is evanescent and elusive like mist.

Look at whatever may appear
In any of the ten directions.
No matter how it may appear,
The thing in itself, its very nature,
Is the sky-like nature of mind,
Beyond the projection and dissolution of thought and concept.

...

Emptiness is the `knowing of one that frees all.’
Emptiness is the supreme king of medicines.
Emptiness is the nectar of immortality.
Emptiness is spontaneous accomplishment beyond effort.
Emptiness is enlightenment without exertion.

...

The Tibetan term for renunciation is ngepar jungwa, which literally means "certainty of release."

Ngepar is short for ngepar shepa, meaning to have certain, decisive knowledge from within. In this case, it refers to having certainty that the nature of worldly existence is suffering. In addition to this certainty, there is the heartfelt wish to be released, jungwa, from this suffering.

One must gain confidence in the fact that the nature of cyclic existence in samsara is suffering, together with having the powerful wish and intention to be free of this suffering. This is what is known as the thought of renunciation.

...

The nature of everything is illusory and impermanent.
Those with dualistic perception believe suffering is happiness.
It is as though they are licking honey from a razor blade.
How sad it is that they grasp to a concrete reality.
Turn your attention within.

...

An effortless compassion can arise for all beings who have not realized their true nature. So limitless is it that if tears could express it, you would cry without end. Not only compassion, but tremendous skillful means can be born when you realize the nature of mind. Also you are naturally liberated from all suffering and fear, such as the fear of birth, death and the intermediate state.

Then if you were to speak of the joy and bliss that arise from this realization, it is said by the buddhas that if you were to gather all the glory, enjoyment, pleasure and happiness of the world and put it all together, it would not approach one tiny fraction of the bliss that you experience upon realizing the nature of mind.



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